Climate Change: An Entire Generation at Risk

The Lancet Countdown recently launched its 2019 report tracking the effects of climate change on health. The message is clear: the future of an entire generation depends on our commitment and ability to keep global warming below 2 degrees Celsius. Climate change represents a major threat to our species, as infectious diseases, pollution and malnutrition will be worsened by rising temperatures. Children are among the most vulnerable.

The publication classifies current efforts to address climate change as “intermittent at best”. The past five years are, together, the warmest in the modern history, as NASA indicates. For Lancet, fossil fuels are the primary driver of climate change. The carbon intensity of our energy system has remained unchanged since the 90s. 

If we continue to follow the “business as usual” pathway, a child born today is likely to live in a world over 4 degrees Celsius warmer than the pre-industrial average. Higher temperatures will have profound impacts on food security, affecting global crop yield and increasing the risk of malnutrition. The number of deaths caused by air pollution will also dramatically increase. Today, air pollution is already responsible for nearly 4.2 million premature deaths worldwide, says the World Health Organization (WHO).

The impact of climate change on disease transmission is particularly concerning. Changes in environmental conditions are already favouring the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases, including malaria. 

Malaria is endemic in many regions worldwide. According to the WHO, Africa carries the higher burden - 92% of the cases and 93% of the deaths in 2017. Malaria claimed 435,000 lives that year, with almost 220 million cases reported in 87 countries. The children under five years old are the most vulnerable and accounted for 61% of the fatalities. 

The situation is likely to get worse. The Lancet’s research indicates that climate suitability for malaria transmission is increasing, especially in the highland areas of Africa. Using 1950s data as reference, the climate suitability for the disease averaged 29.9% above it from 2012 to 2017. Unfortunately, this is not limited to malaria - all pathogens studied presented an increasing rate of suitability.

We are facing life-threatening challenges, and there is no time for “business as usual”. As noted by the authors, overcoming health challenges caused by climate change requires new approaches to policy-making, business and research. Health will have to be at the centre of decisions if we want to move away from current catastrophic trends.

If you are interested in learning more about vector-borne diseases and innovative tools to eradicate malaria, visit the Target Malaria’s website.

 

 

Private Sector Engagement at the 46th Committee on World Food Security

CFS46 took place at FAO Headquarters in Rome from October 14-18, and the Private Sector Mechanism had its largest delegation to date, with 211 business leaders, including over 30 youth and representatives of youth organizations, registered from 45 countries.

We are so proud of this year’s delegation, which included more geographical, sector, and age diversity than ever before. We would like to extend a special thanks to the leadership teams of the youth organizations present at CFS46, who helped to guide their groups and make the most of their CFS experience. Of course, none of this would be possible without the generosity of our PSM funders, whose voluntary contributions support the work of the PSM Secretariat. The PSM is more active and engaged with the CFS than ever before, and we look forward to continuing our close collaboration with you to ensure that its activity in this forum continues to grow.

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World Diabetes Day: Avena Canadiense supports the Mexican Diabetes Federation to promote World Diabetes Day

November 14 is World Diabetes Day. For the third consecutive year, Avena Canadiense is partnering with the Mexican Diabetes Federation, A.C. to raise awareness about the importance of early diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes and the role of diet in diabetes management.

The International Diabetes Federation and the World Health Organization began World Diabetes Day in 1991 in response to the growing health threat posed by diabetes. 

Diabetes is a very serious public health problem in Mexico where more than 12 million people live with diabetes and half of them ignore their condition. Diabetes is among the leading causes of death and disease in the country. Having a balanced diet and physical activity are key measures to prevent and reduce diabetes.

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2019 High Level Dinner: Multistakeholder Partnerships to Finance and Improve Food Security and Nutrition in the framework of the 2030 Agenda

The High Level Dinner (HLD) provides a forum for senior leadership from the private sector and civil society to interact with Ambassadors, leaders and Permanent Representatives to the Rome-based agencies to discuss current opportunities and challenges in the context of the UN Committee on World Food Security (CFS). This year, the conversation focused on “Multistakeholder Partnerships to Finance and Improve Food Security and Nutrition in the framework of the 2030 Agenda”. A successful sustainable development agenda requires partnerships between governments, the private sector and civil society. These inclusive partnerships built upon principles and values, a shared vision, and shared goals that place people and the planet at the centre, are needed at the global, regional, national and local level.

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United Nations Day

Every year, since 1948, United Nations Day has been celebrated on 24 October. This Day marks the observance of the anniversary of the entry into force of the UN Charter in 1945 when the organization officially came into being. Falling in October as it does, the Day is celebrated when the Main Segment of the General Assembly, which runs from September to December, is in full swing. 

To celebrate the UN is to celebrate multilateralism and the international community. As the world community increasingly recognizes the interdependence of all countries, all constituencies and all peoples, the UN’s critical role in setting normative standards, on many crucial levels, is highlighted, underscored and reinforced. This was no more evident than during the first week of the opening of the current 74th Session of the General Assembly, last month in September, that included five high-level meetings with the participation of numerous Heads of State and Government and Ministers representing the 193 Member States of the UN.  

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Representing the Business Sector at the UN Committee on World Food Security

The UN Committee on World Food Security (CFS) will be holding its 46th annual session October 14-18, 2019 at the FAO in Rome. This year’s CFS is all the more important as the SDG Summit clearly showed last fall the shortfalls of commitments towards achieving the SDGs. SDG2 is central to almost all SDGs, yet the number of hungry and malnourished has been increasing steadily for the past three years to raise the unbelievable number of 820 million hungry people. Achieving SDG2 is feasible in our lifetime. We must stand united in the fight towards Zero Hunger and the CFS is the most prominent forum bringing together all actors who have the ability to find solutions for food security, nutrition and sustainable agriculture. Emerging is the Secretariat of the Private Sector Mechanism (PSM) and will be coordinating the business delegation to CFS, which will bring over 200 individuals from the entire agri-food value chain. We will also be hosting four side-events. If you are in Rome for CFS, you are kindly invited to attend them:

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1st Annual Natural Foods Competition

 

On August 12th, 2019 American Natural Foods (ANF) hosted the 1st Natural Foods Competition with a focus on pulses. American Natural Foods is a non-profit organization founded by Chef Ron Pickarski in 1996. The organization is passionate about increasing the reach of plant-based meals and information. 

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After 75 years, agriculture and nutrition meet again

This post was originally written by Jessica Fanzo and Derek Byerlee for IFPRI.

One in a series of guest blog posts from leading voices in global development on achieving long-term sustainability and growth while ending hunger, poverty, and malnutrition.

A history of shifting global priorities in the fight against hunger

For the third year in a row, the recently-released FAO State of Food Insecurity and Nutrition report highlights global increases in undernourishment after decades of decline. Meanwhile, the report notes, no region is exempt from widespread micronutrient deficiencies and the rising trend in overweight and obesity. The same week in June, we published a piece in the journal Global Food Security looking back 75 years to the pioneering 1943 UN Conference on Food and Agriculture in Hot Springs, Va., where the first international commitment to ending hunger was made.

That conference set the goal of “freedom from want of food, suitable and adequate for the health and strength of all peoples” that should be achieved “in all lands within the shortest possible time.” Seventy five years after this clarion call, as well as the dozens of similar global declarations made in the interim, it is sobering that various complex forms of malnutrition persist in most countries.

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Sight and Life Nutrition Leadership Award - Nominations Open

 

Great leadership is about having a vision of an improved world, acting on that vision and inspiring others to do the same.

  • A good leader is a visionary, not a dreamer: someone who not only dreams and talks about a better world but steps up to realize his vision. 
  • A good leader is innovative and creative: someone who seeks new solutions to a problem and provides the knowledge and methods to take them into action. 
  • A good leader is passionate: someone who is driven by a passion about his or her work to improve the current situation. 
  • A good leader has courage: someone who rises and takes initiative in difficult times. 
  • A transformative leader is an inspiration: someone who inspires, encourages, and helps other people achieving improvement.

In this spirit, Sight and Life has announced the Sight and Life Nutrition Leadership Award 2019 to be presented this November at the SUN Global Gathering in Nepal.

Do you know a leader changing the future of nutrition? Please submit a nomination for the Sight and Life Nutrition Leadership Award 2019 by September 30, 2019. 

PAST RECIPIENTS

David Nabarro, 2012; Robert Black, 2013; Anna Lartey, 2014; Shawn Baker, 2015; Shilpa Bhatte and Ellen Piwoz, 2017

SUBMIT A NOMINATION HERE

 

 

Emerging ag Tours Alberta

As the Emerging team is based around the world, there are few instances for the all of us to come together. Twice a year, the team members of Emerging ag inc are able to come together and it always proves to be equally as fun as it is productive.

Last month the team traveled to Calgary, Alberta, Canada for four days of meetings, trainings, and farm tours. The initial meetings give everyone a chance to collaborate and review the status of clients, and give input on projects that they may not have a hand in on the day-to-day. The brainstorming sessions prove to be informative and inspirational, not just for those involved in a certain project, but giving ideas to everyone that can be utilized in different ways. From this, our clients are able to benefit as the team comes up with new and innovative ways to provide our services.

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