The 45th Committee on World Food Security (CFS)

This October 15-19, the 45th session of the Committee on World Food Security (CFS) will take place in Rome, Italy. This Plenary session is an opportunity for many stakeholders to gather for discussion, debate, and decision-making on the most pressing issues in food security today. The world’s largest and most diverse policymaking body on food security, CFS is open to all UN member states, the private sector, civil society, philanthropic organizations, and research groups. The annual weeklong Plenary session is free to attend and is filled with side events, Plenary discussions, poster presentations, networking opportunities, and bilateral meetings.

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Urgent action needed to reverse rise in hunger, warns FAO at HLPF

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN (FAO) raised the alarm of increasing hunger in the world, at the 2018 High-Level Political Forum (HLPF) in New York.

“Three years after the adoption of the 2030 Agenda, hunger is on the rise and urgent action is needed to ensure the trend is reversed. At the same time, obesity and other forms of malnutrition are a growing concern not only in developed but also in developing countries”, said Lucas Tavares, FAO Senior Liaison Officer, speaking at the General Debate.

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POGA Recipe Contest Winners Announced

During the month of May, Emerging worked with the Prairie Oat Growers Association of Canada to run the fourth annual oat recipe contest. This contest, which was open to all residents and citizens of Mexico, served multiple purposes: to celebrate the creativity of Mexican chefs, be they professional or amateur; to promote the incredible versatility of oats as an ingredient to include far beyond a bowl of morning oatmeal; and to raise awareness of the many health benefits of oats. 

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WhyLivestockMatter Website Launch

Livestock are critical for global development yet often overlooked. The world’s cows, sheep, goats, pigs, poultry and other farm animals are the mainstay of livelihoods the world over. And the energy and nutrient-dense milk, meat, and eggs these animals produce provide hundreds of millions of families in the world’s poorer countries with essential food and nutrition.

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PSM Info Session Held in Nairobi, Kenya

On Thursday, March 1st, the Private Sector Mechanism (PSM) held an information session in Nairobi, Kenya. The hope for this event was to engage with more farmers, SMEs, and agricultural entrepreneurs in East Africa, an area that represents incredible growth, potential, and challenges in the ongoing fight to end malnutrition and hunger worldwide by 2030. 

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Celebrating the first Global Pulse Day in Burkina Faso

Tuesday, February 20, 2018 - On Monday, February 19, 2018, Burkina Faso hosted the first Global Pulse Day in Koumbané, a rural commune of Namissiguima in Yatenga. The celebreation took place in the presence of Roch Marc Christian Kaboré and the Director-General of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), José Graziano da Silva, as well as the President of the Global Pulse Confederation (GPC), Huseyin Arslan.

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Africa Biotech Conference 2017

The International Agri-Food Network is proud to be supporting the attendance of seven farmers and SME representatives at the FAO Regional Meeting on Agricultural Biotechnologies in Sustainable Food Systems and Nutrition in Sub-Saharan Africa, which will take place in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, from November 21st – 25th, 2017. 

These seven extraordinary individuals are:

  • Daniel Kamanga, Director for the Communication Program at Africa Harvest Biotech International Foundation, a member of CropLife International network, in South Africa. Daniel has helped Africa Harvest to develop extensive media networks in Africa to facilitate the public’s acceptance of biotech across the African continent. 
  • Ruramiso Mashumba, Executive Director of Chomwedzi Farm and founder of Mnandi Africa in Zimbabwe, an initiative that provides skills development, market access, and agro-technology services, with a focus on celebrating indigenous grains. 
  • Francis Wanjohi, Chairman at the Agricultural Biotechnology Awareness Association in Kenya, a non-profit founded by agricultural biotechnology professionals to educate the public about the great opportunities in biotech. 
  • Bransford Owusu, a smallholder farmer from Ghana and a member of the Global Farmer Network.
  • Gideon Mugo Makanga, a farmer from Kenya and leader of Integrated Community Organisation for Sustainable Education and Empowerment for Development (ICOSEED), a community-based non-profit that works to enhance sustainable community livelihoods. 
  • Gilbert Arap Bor, a lecturer at Catholic University of Eastern Africa and manager of a farming cooperative in Western Kenya. He is also a member of the Global Farmer Network and frequently writes articles that are published in local and international media. 
  • Peter Wamboga-Mugirya, a leader at The Science Foundation for Livelihoods and Development (SCIFODE) in Uganda, an organisation that exists to harness the benefits of science and technology for development impact. 
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Improving Capacity Development to Retain Youth in Agriculture

In order to feed a world of nine billion people by 2050, we need more people working in agriculture in all its forms. Despite the universal agreement on the importance of agriculture to our future, we are not succeeding in attracting young people to the field. While the reasons for this are many, we believe that one central problem in the context of capacity-development programs is insufficient attention to the creation and maintenance of meaningful and supportive networks post-program. 

Many excellent capacity-development programs for young agricultural leaders exist; a few inspiring examples have already been mentioned in this discussion. To the credit of those programs illustrated here, several highlight the importance of their post-program network. We see formal, committed networks – which, depending on context, might connect people in a particular geographical area; build relationships between new farmers and experienced ones; improve integration between various actors along the food value chain; provide fora for discussing problems and solutions across locales; and more – as serving many functions in supporting impactful young agricultural leaders. First, being part of a formal network helps increase access to investment and mitigate risk, since networks multiply connections. This fact is particularly essential to youth, whose individual networks may not provide the resources they need to begin their careers in agriculture. Second, networks, even largely virtual ones, help to satisfy social needs that can be compromised when one chooses a life in agriculture. They also provide opportunities for formal and informal mentorship. Third, and perhaps most importantly, active networks create an enabling environment in which partnerships between agripreneurs are born. Active networks can be considered in some ways as incubators for grassroots problem-solving of not only SDG2 but many of the other goals as well.

Modern technology can and should absolutely play a central role in establishing and maintaining networks of support, enabling knowledge sharing, and encouraging innovation. While having strong connections with other farmers and agripreneurs in one’s geographical area provides one type of essential support, the nature of technology provides a complement to local knowledge in the form of geographically diverse problem solving. Activating such networks is not only a key way to fast-track the implementation of solutions; it is also a way to clarify to young agricultural leaders that they are part of a meaningful global profession, not a lone farmer in the field. 

If we wish to celebrate agriculture as a profession that is modern, profitable, and cool, then farmers and agripreneurs cannot be perceived as isolated people hidden in rural locales. They must be socially, intellectually, and financially engaged with other farmers, processors, distributors, vendors, researchers, restaurateurs, and all food chain actors. Accomplishing this means investing not only in capacity development programs themselves but also in post-program networks that are productive, solutions-oriented, and specifically designed to meet young agricultural leaders’ needs.