emerging blog

Morgane has been working in international development and communications in relation to the agrifood sector for the past 15 years. She has worked for international organizations, NGOs, and the private sector. She has been a spokesperson for specific industries as well as business groups in international policy processes. For two years, she was the private sector representative at the UN Committee on World Food Security where she helped found the Private Sector Mechanism. She was also vice-chair of the Food and Agriculture Committee of the Business and Industry Advisory Committee (BIAC) to the OECD. Morgane is passionate about building engagement with diverse stakeholders and representing civil society in United Nations processes and agencies. She has a strong background in corporate and digital communications.

Prior to joining Emerging Ag, Morgane was Director of Communications at the International Fertilizer Industry Association (IFA). During her time at IFA, she co-chaired the Farming First coalition. She also worked for the World Bank and the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). She has conducted fieldwork in Latin America and Africa. A French national, Morgane is fluent in French, English, Portuguese and Spanish. She holds a Master of Science in Development Studies from the London School of Economics, an MBA from the Sorbonne Graduate Business School, a BA in History from the Sorbonne University and a BA in Chinese from the International Institute of Oriental Languages.

Steps to Eradicate Childhood Stunting & Achieve SDG2.2

Originally published in Farming First. Part of Farming First’s #SDG2countdown on SDG2.2: ending malnutrition, featuring three projects on the frontline of the battle against stunting

Stunting continues to be one of the most pernicious and widespread forms of malnutrition, having a disproportionate impact on the most vulnerable populations compared with other types of malnourishment. According to 2016 data, 155 million children under five around the world are stunted, representing more than 20 per cent of the under-five population. The majority of stunted children are in Asia (87 million) and in Africa (59 million).

Resulting from insufficient food and nutrients, stunting has significant consequences for human health as well as social and economic development. The effects last a lifetime, ranging from impaired brain development, lower IQ, weakened immune systems, and greater risk of serious diseases like diabetes and cancer later in life. Beyond the devastating personal impacts, stunting is also an enormous drain on economic productivity and growth. Economists estimate that it can reduce a country’s GDP by as much as 12 per cent.

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Food Security and Nutrition in an Urbanizing World

The International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) launched today its 2017 Global Food Policy Report, which focuses this year on Food Security and Nutrition in an Urbanizing World. The launch event took place in Brussels, on the eve of the European Days, on June 6, 2017, with the participation of SNV World and Welthungerhilfe. I was invited to moderate the keynote interview session on “International Responses to Urbanization”, featuring two wonderful speakers: Brave Ndisela, Strategic Programme Leader for Food Security and Nutrition at the FAO, and Gerda Verburg, Coordinator of the Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) Movement and Assistant Secretary-General to the United Nations. 

The IFPRI report shows a clear picture of the massive and rapid urbanization trend that is happening around the world and more strikingly in Africa and in Asia. By 2050, two thirds of the world population will live in urban areas. As urban population grows, poverty, food insecurity and malnutrition are increasingly becoming urban problems. The speakers addressed some of the priority actions that are needed to counter these trends. 

IFPRI did a Survey (the results are in the report) showing that 73% of the respondents think the expansion of cities and urban population will make it harder to ensure that everyone gets enough nutritious food to eat. The speakers presented the scale and space of urbanization in the developing world and the problems of food security and nutrition that are growing fast among urban population. They also noted the opportunities, in particular more balanced linkages between urban and rural. 

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Canada’s new investment to support food safety and a reformed Codex Alimentarius

During the G20 Agriculture Ministers’ Meeting held in Berlin on January 22, the Canadian Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, Lawrence MacAulay, met with the Director General of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Dr. José Graziano da Silva, and announced a contribution of $1 million to support international bodies that develop the standards for food safety and plant and animal health. This new investment will go towards scientific and technical work of the Codex Alimentarius and the International Plant Protection Convention, supported by the FAO, and the World Organization for Animal Health in their efforts to promote a safe, fair and science-based trading environment. This will be added to Canada’s ongoing financial voluntary and membership contributions to the FAO to support its work to improve global food security, agriculture, fisheries, and forestry. 

The importance of the Codex Alimentarius relies on the crucial role it plays in enabling trade in agricultural products that benefits both producers and consumers. One of its responsibilities is to set standards in terms of international pesticide Maximum Residue limits (MRLs). Recognition of the importance of the Codex’s role in establishing MRLs has led to recent efforts by its members to improve its functioning and, since 2007, the time of the MRL elaboration process was reduced from over 10 years to approximately 2 years. Yet, it is still too much. 

Ideally Codex MRLs should be established soon after a new active ingredient or new use is approved by a national authority and in use on crops entering international commerce. For this reason, delays in the establishment of MRLs, or the failure to develop them, and the resulting lack of harmonisation affect badly market access, productivity and farmer livelihoods. MRLs are needed to make registered products useful to farmers who wish to trade, or must trade. If there is no Codex MRL in place, importing countries can apply zero or near-zero default tolerances for residues of products.

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Let's be BOLD on International Women's Day

Today we are celebrating International Women Day #IWD2017. This year’s theme is #BeBoldForChange! Being bold is indeed what women need to do to take their destiny in their own hands. 

Change will not happen organically and it will not happen in our lifetime if all of us women don’t question every day the status-quo.

WE have to be bold to refuse the archaic roles assigned to women in the family and in the professional life.

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How to hold a Global Pulse Day Event on January 18th, 2017 #GlobalPulseDay #LovePulses

Register your event: http://pulses.org/register-global-pulse-day 

If you love beans, peas, lentils and chickpeas, January 18, 2017 is going to become your favorite cooking day. It will be the second ever Global Pulse Day, a global event to celebrate pulses and continue the momentum of the 2016 International Year of Pulses. Encourage people around the world to eat pulses on January 18th. Raise awareness on the multiple benefits of consuming pulses for people and the planet. 

The first Global Pulse Day took place on January 6, 2016 as “Pulse Feast”, with 141 events spanning 36 countries, reaching 21 million people. 

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Private Sector Delegation at the UN Committee on World Food Security

A delegation of over 170 business leaders were in Rome for the 43rd plenary session of the UN Committee on World Food Security (CFS) that took place at the FAO, October 17th-21st. The delegation was coordinated by the Private Sector Mechanism (PSM). Participation was met with excellent feedback from member states and the United Nations, and the PSM secretariat wishes to extend its thanks to all those who were present. The PSM is more active and engaged with the CFS than ever before, and we look forward to your continued support in ensuring that its stature in this forum continues to grow.

 Highlights:

  • Succesful meeting with FAO Director General Jose Graziano da Silva, including efforts to address regional engagement with FAO
  • Bilateral meetings with representatives from more than 60 member states and UN agencies
  • 21 interventions made from the floor by a full range of delegation members on a broad selection of topics in the CFS agenda, as well as several plenary panel slots for PSM members
  • The PSM was able to organize 4 side events and a book launch this year, reaching over 230 attendees
  • High Level Dinner bringing together 190 ambassadors, representatives of CFS member states, UN agencies, NGOs, and companies, as well as the chair of the CFS, Her Excellency Ambassador Amira Gornass and Mastercard Vice-President Tara Nathan, to discuss the role of innovation in achieving the SDGs.
  • The Partnership Forum on the Sustainable Development Goals, co-hosted with Norway and the UN Global Compact attracted an audience of 80. Featuring a diverse selection of speakers, the discussion spoke to every goal of the 17 SDGs.
  • Succesful endorsement of CFS recommendations on the role of livestock for sustainable agriculture and on connecting smallholders to markets.

For more information on the Private Sector Mechanism: www.agrifood.net 

World Food Day: Building the Zero Hunger Generation

On October 16 the world will celebrate World Food Day, a global movement to end hunger. This year’s theme is “Climate is changing. Food and agriculture must too”. The FAO wants to give an opportunity to university students to join global efforts to achieve Zero Hunger.

In September 2015, 193 countries adopted the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and in doing so, committed to end hunger by 2030. The next step is to unite efforts and work together towards this goal - governments, international organizations, the private sector, academia, farmers, and also the general public all have a role to play.

Without addressing climate change, this important goal cannot be reached. Climate change is affecting the health of our planet and changing our world. It is causing more natural disasters and environmental problems, which make it harder for us to grow food.  In order to feed a growing population set to reach 9.6 billion by the year 2050, we will have to learn to grow what we need in a sustainable way.

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Partnership Forum on Livestock: Final Report now available online

At its 41st session in October 2014, the UN Committee on World Food Security (CFS) requested the High-Level Panel of Experts (HLPE) to prepare a study on Sustainable Agricultural Development for Food Security and Nutrition: What Roles for Livestock? Ahead of the launch of this report launch, the Private Sector Mechanism to the CFS and the Government of Argentina co-hosted a Partnership Forum on Livestock on June 30 at the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) in Rome, Italy.

Over 65 participants were in attendance, including over 20 permanent representations of member states to the UN Rome-Based Agencies, senior UN officials, members of the Private Sector Mechanism, NGOs and academics. The event was framed in the context of the upcoming negotiations that will take place at the UN Committee on World Food Security on Livestock.

The event started with a keynote address by Dr Jimmy Smith, Director General of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI). Smith believes that livestock should be viewed not as a problem to be fixed but as part of many solutions to many global problems. His address was reported on the ILRI website here. The event also showcased two additional keynote presentations and a set of rapid fire presentations highlighting projects undertaken by the private sector in order to improve the sustainability of the livestock sector and its contributions to food security and nutrition. A total of 27 presentations were made at the event.

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Emerging Ag congratulates Dr Lawrence Haddad on his appointment as new Executive Director for the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN)

In June, I had the privilege of being invited as a guest to the GAIN Partnership Council annual meeting that took place in Geneva. It was an excellent event that brought together a diverse group of participants from GAIN staff, academia, civil society, and the private sector. I attended as a representative of the Private Sector Mechanism to the UN Committee on World Food Security (CFS) in order to further linkages between GAIN and the CFS. At the time of the meeting, the search committee had not yet announced who the new Executive Director (replacing Marc Van Ameringen) would be. I was delighted to hear the appointment of Dr Haddad. Having worked at IFPRI previously in my career, I was all the more pleased. Dr Haddad’s reputation speaks to itself. He will continue being a leading figure in the international nutrition policy in this new capacity. The PSM Working Group on Nutrition will be keen on engaging with him.

EDD Session: Ending Hunger and Undernutrition: It can be done faster

The numbers are staggering. Hunger and undernutrition are persistent and unacceptable human tragedies that cause and perpetuate poverty and have huge social and economic costs.  Yet, preventing malnutrition is one of the most efficient development interventions: malnutrition prevention programs deliver $16 in returns on investment for every $1 spent.

The case for improving food security and nutrition is clear; the challenge comes in accomplishing it and progress has been too slow.

Is it the lack of political will?

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